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PubMed

What is PubMed Clinical Queries?

PubMed Clinical Queries is a tool created for clinicians to quickly find evidence without performing a full literature search.

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The tool is used to limit search results to specific clinical research areas:

  • Clinical Studies
  • Systematic Reviews
  • Medical Genetics

For comprehensive searches, use PubMed directly.

Clinical Studies in PubMed Clinical Queries

Once you have entered relevant terms from your research question:

  • Select a Study Category from the dropdown menu.
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    There are five Clinical Study Categories:
    • Etiology - Filter uses search terms related to cohort studies and risk.
    • Diagnosis - Filter uses search terms related to diagnosis, specificity or sensitivity.
    • Therapy (default choice) - Filter uses search terms related to clinical trials, controlled trials, random allocation and theraputic use.
    • Prognosis - Filter uses search terms related to prognosis, cohort studies, follow-up studies, incidence and prediction.
    • Clinical Prediction Guides - Filter uses language related to validation, observer variation, predictive value and scoring systems.
  • There are two scope filters:
    • Broad - Sensitive search – includes relevant citations but probably less relevant; will retrieve more (default)
    • Narrow - Specific search – will get more precise, relevant citations but less retrieval

Systematic Reviews in PubMed Clinical Queries

undefinedWhen you enter search terms into Clinical Queries, the center column lists some a small selection of systematic review search results.

Click See all in the bottom right corner of the search results to view the complete set of results in PubMed.

This is accomplished using a filter. The specific terms that PubMed uses for the systematic review filter can be viewed here:

This is the same search strategy used to filter articles in PubMed when the Systematic Review Article Type filter is selected. This search strategy is periodically modified by the National Library of Medicine.